MALE BREAST REDUCTION

MALE BREAST REDUCTION

You don't have to let gynecomastia keep you from feeling your most confident. With the help of a skilled, qualified cosmetic surgeon, you can restore a naturally masculine appearance to your chest. Today's advanced techniques allow for a short surgery, quick recovery, and virtually invisible scars. Learn more about male breast reduction surgery below.

Reassurance, aromatase inhibitors, SERMs, or surgery. Gynecomastia is an endocrine system disorder in which a noncancerous increase in the size of male breast tissue occurs. Psychological distress may occur. The development ofgynecomastia is usually associated with benign pubertal changes. Gynecomastia is an endocrine system disorder in which a noncancerous increase in the size of male breast tissue occurs. Psychological distress may occur. The development of gynecomastia is usually associated with benign pubertal changes. However, 75% of pubertal gynecomastia cases resolve within two years of onset without treatment. In rare cases, gynecomastia has been known to occur in association with certain disease states. The pathologic causes of gynecomastia are diverse and may include Klinefelter syndrome, certain cancers, endocrine disorders, metabolic dysfunction, various medications, or may occur due to a natural decline in testosterone production. Disturbances in the endocrine system that lead to an increase in the ratio of estrogens/androgens are thought to be responsible for the development of gynecomastia. This may occur even if the levels of estrogens and androgens are both appropriate, but the ratio is altered. Diagnosis is based on signs and symptoms. Conservative management of gynecomastia is often appropriate, as the condition commonly resolves on its own. Medical treatment of gynecomastia that has persisted beyond two years is often ineffective. Medications such as aromatase inhibitors have been found to be effective in rare cases of gynecomastia from disorders such as aromatase excess syndrome or Peutz–Jeghers syndrome, but surgical removal of the excess tissue is usually required. Gynecomastia is common. Physiologic gynecomastia develops in up to 70% of adolescent boys. Newborns and adolescent males often experience temporary gynecomastia due to the influence of maternal hormones and hormonal changes during puberty,

Treatment

Mild cases of gynecomastia in adolescence may be treated with advice on lifestyle habits such as proper diet and exercise with reassurance. In more severe cases, medical treatment may be tried including surgical intervention.

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Medication

Medical treatment of gynecomastia is most effective when done within the first two years after the start of male breast enlargement. Selective estrogen receptor modulators(SERMs) such as tamoxifen, raloxifene, and clomifene may be beneficial in the treatment of gynecomastia but are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in gynecomastia. Clomifene seems to be less effective than tamoxifen or raloxifene. Tamoxifen may be used for painful gynecomastia in adults. Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) such as anastrozole have been used off-label for cases of gynecomastia occurring during puberty but are less effective than SERMs. A few cases of gynecomastia caused by the rare disorders aromatase excess syndrome and Peutz–Jeghers syndrome have responded to treatment with AIs such as anastrozole. Androgens/anabolic steroids may be effective for gynecomastia. Testosterone itself may not be suitable to treat gynecomastia as it can be aromatized into estradiol, but nonaromatizable androgens like topicalandrostanolone (dihydrotestosterone) can be useful.

Surgery

Male with asymmetrical gynecomastia, before and after excision of the gland and liposuction of the waist If chronic gynecomastia is treated, surgical removal of glandular breast tissue is usually required. Surgical approaches to the treatment of gynecomastia include subcutaneous mastectomy, liposuction-assisted mastectomy, laser-assisted liposuction, and laser-lipolysis without liposuction. Complications of mastectomy may include hematoma, surgical wound infection, breast asymmetry, changes in sensation in the breast, necrosis of the areola or nipple, seroma, noticeable or painful scars, and contour deformities.